research institute for compassionate economics

People

Nidhi Khurana

Research Fellow

[email protected]

Nidhi has a masters in Sociology from the Delhi School of Economics. Before joining r.i.c.e., she worked with the Navjyoti India Foundation and the Eawag Aquatic Research.  She has traveled to many parts of rural North India to document issues related to human development, most recently to manage r.i.c.e.’s SQUAT survey in 2013-14.  Her research interests include social stratification based on caste, education as an economic and social good, gender and socialization.

See Nidhi’s CV here.

Blog

diane

r.i.c.e. article in THE WIRE

By Nikhil Srivastav, on March 23rd, 2017

Swachh Bharat Mission since its inception has been facing a drought in terms of policy solutions. Given that 2019 is the target for achieving an open defecation free India, the program has already lived half of its life and yetRead More..

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2016 Jeroen Ensink Memorial Prize Announcement

By admin, on March 21st, 2017

Payal, Dean, and Diane's article, "Can collective strategies motivate behavior change to reduce open defecation in rural India?" was recently honored with the Jeroen Ensink Memorial Prize from Waterlines Journal.   See the announcement and full paper here. The award wasRead More..

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How to continue the pit emptying momentum

By Sangita Vyas, on March 11th, 2017

I'm pasting below a list of practical action ideas that Robert Chambers has proposed after the pit emptying demonstration in Warangal. These are activities that governments and organizations can take up alike, to break down taboos around pit emptying related to caste andRead More..

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Maternity benefits - not yet universal

By Payal Hathi, on March 1st, 2017

At the start of the new year, we were excited to see forward momentum on the national maternity entitlements program: the prime minister announced that the program would be made universal and cover all districts beginning January 1st, 2017 (upRead More..

Research

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Understanding open defecation in rural India: Untouchability, pollution, and latrine pits

By Aashish Gupta, on January 7th, 2017

Open defecation in rural India presents a puzzle: India has far higher open defecation rates than other developing regions where people are poorer, literacy rates are lower, and water is more scarce.  Because open defecation has terrible consequences for health,Read More..

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Switching to sanitation: Understanding latrine adoption in a representative panel of rural Indian households

By Diane Coffey, on December 28th, 2016

Open defecation, which is still practiced by about a billion people worldwide, is one of the most examples of how place influences health in developing countries. Because of the negative healthy externalities of open defecation, eliminating it is a priorityRead More..

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Intergenerational effects of women's status: Evidence from child height in joint Indian households

By Diane Coffey, on December 19th, 2016

The hypothesis that a woman's social status has intergenerational effects on the human capital of her children has featured prominently in development policy and social science. Our paper is the first to econometrically identify such an effect. We exploit anRead More..

diane

An Experiment with Air Purifiers in Delhi during Winter 2015-2016

By Sangita Vyas, on December 15th, 2016

Particulate pollution has important consequences for human health, and is an issue of global concern. Outdoor air pollution has become a cause for alarm in India in particular because recent data suggest that ambient pollution levels in Indian cities areRead More..