research institute for compassionate economics

People

Michael Geruso

Board Member

[email protected]

Mike’s healthcare research focuses on selection and payment regulation in US health insurance markets. He has used publicly available and large-scale administrative datasets to investigate upcoding by physicians and insurers, imperfect competition in Medicare Advantage markets, cream skimming by plans in the ACA Marketplaces, and spending and quality differences among competing Medicaid Managed Care plans.  Mike’s developing country research focuses on the environmental determinants of infant health and survival, including poor local sanitation and extreme weather. His work has been published in peer-reviewed outlets including the American Economic ReviewAmerican Economic Journal: Applied Economics, and the Journal of Health Economics and has been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, NPR, and the Economist magazine. His research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and he is a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research.  Mike holds bachelor’s degrees from Virginia Tech and a PhD in Economics from Princeton. He completed postdoctoral work at Harvard prior to joining the University of Texas at Austin. His CV is here.

Blog

diane

Sanitation and Infant mortality externalities paper on fivethirtyeight

By Michael Geruso, on May 27th, 2015

This week, FiveThirtyEight blog highlighted a newly-released working paper by Dean Spears and I. The paper, now posted as part of the National Bureau of Economic Research's working paper series, studies the infant mortality externalities of poor sanitation. The paper, "Neighborhood SanitationRead More..

Research

diane

Neighborhood Sanitation and Infant Mortality

By Michael Geruso, on May 1st, 2015

Ending open defecation in the developing world has gained significant policy attention recently, motivated by the idea that private demand for latrines lies below the social optimum. We investigate the mortality externalities of poor sanitation by exploiting differences in latrineRead More..